Part Deux: Marketing is everything, especially the “process” stuff

Eric Karjaluoto tells a story about why you should consider forgetting social media.  Agree or disagree; there’s a larger marketing lesson in his story.  It’s a tale of finding a dentist in Vancouver and the importance of s-e-r-v-i-c-e.

The first dentist’s office is ultra-sleek and equipped with all the modern amenities (e.g., flat screen TVs):

My young, impeccably well-groomed dentist (who I have since nicknamed “Mr. Shiny”) finally made his appearance. He greeted me warmly and asked, “What would you like to change about your smile?” By the end of my appointment, I had a work-order in hand for approximately $1,000 in services. They seemed to believe that these were quite pressing matters that should be addressed quickly.

Feeling uncomfortable with the experience, he decided to look for another dentist.  Found was a dentist’s office with imperfect decor and lacking (the admittedly unnecessary) modern amenities:

My new dentist spoke with me for a few moments, and then proceeded to clean my teeth. I’ve never had this happen before; in my experience dentists dart-in and do the “big stuff” leaving the cleaning to an army of bubbly twenty-year-old hygienists. I was rather dumbfounded.

She explained that although this may be a less profitable approach, it helped her better “know” her patients’ teeth. She told me a little about her kids and how proud of them she was; no big sale–just a friendly chat. Along the way she mentioned that although her practice is small, at the end of the day she always feels good about the work she does.

I noted that I likely had work that needed to be done, given the results of my check-up and the procedures that were suggested two years ago. She looked closely at the x-rays and explained that although she’d love to sell me something, I really didn’t need any of it.

This goes back to the marketing is everything, “process” stuff conversation.  Provide excellent service and the “marketing” budget could be slashed; pay attention:

The dentist I finally ended-up with simply concentrated on doing her job well. While so many of us are overwhelmed by the many things we could do to market our companies, I believe hers is in fact a much better way to do so.

Within five-minutes of leaving my new dentist’s office I called my parents to talk about how great the experience was. Since then I have told no fewer than ten people the same story. I’ve even started conversations with friends noting, “Do you have a good dentist? If not, I just found an amazing one!”

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